Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

ly supposed—maintaine■d that no prince, whether his name was Charles o●r Clement, had any business to meddle with h●is kingdom. The act of the 23rd ●March, by which the pope had ●condemned him, had terminated his■ long endurance: Clement VII. had■ declared war against him and H●enry VIII. accepted it. A man, though he be ●ordinarily the slave of his passions, has some■times im

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

pulses which belong to great ch●aracters. Henry determined to finish with the● pope as the pope had finished● with him. He will declare himsel●f master in his own island; dauntlessly he wi●ll brave Rome and the imperial pow■er ready to assail him. Erelong the f●ire which consumed him appeared■ to kindle his subjects. The political party, ■at the head of which were Suffolk and ■

Collect from /

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

Gardiner, was ready to give up the papacy, ●even while maintaining the dogma■s of catholicism. The evangeli●cal party desired to go farther, and drive ●the catholic doctrines out of Engl■and. These two hostile sections u●nited their forces against the common enemy. ● At the head of the evangelicals, who we●re eventually to prevail under the so■n of Henry VIII., were two men of g

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

reat intel●ligence, destined to be powerful i●nstruments in the enfranchisement of Englan●d. Cranmer, the ecclesiastical le■ader of the party, gave way too easil●y to the royal pressure; but bei■ng a moderate theologian, a conscient■ious Christian, a skilful administ■rator, and indefatigable worker, he care●fully studied the Scriptures, the Father●s, and even the Schoolmen; he

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

took note of t■heir sayings, and strengthened by their ■opinions, continued the work of th■e Reformation with calmness and perseverance. ●Beside him stood Cromwell, the lay {23} ● leader of protestant feelin■g. Gifted in certain respects with a generous● character, he loved to bene■fit those who had helped him in adversity; but t■oo attentive to his own inter■ests, he profite

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

d by the Reformation t■o increase his riches and honors. Inferior■ to Cranmer in moral qualities, he ●had a surer and a wider glance than the p●rimate; he saw clearly the end for whi■ch he must strive and the means necessary ●to be employed, and combined much activit■y with his talents. These leade■rs were strongly supported. A ●certain number of ministers and lay members of● t

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

he Church desired an evangelical reform in● England. Latimer, a popular orato●r, was the tribune commissioned to scatter thro●ugh the nation the principles whose triumph C●ranmer and Cromwell sought. He preac●hed throughout the whole extent of■ the province of Canterbury; bu●t if his bold language enlightened the w●ell-disposed, it irritated the priest●s and monks. His great rep

Nunc vitae hendrerit leo

utation led to his■ being invited to preach before the ●king and queen. Cranmer, fearing his inci●sive language and sarcastic tone, beg●ged him to say nothing in the pulpi■t that would indicate any sore■ness about his late disgrace. 'In your sermon■ let not any sparkle or suspicion ■of grudge appear to remain in you.[44] If you ●attack with the Word of God any sin or superstit●